Leilon

This small human mining town sprawls along the High Road, on the Sword Coast. It lacks walls (an earthen bank surmounted by a wooden palisade shields it from the landward side, but where the road pierces these works there are no gates), and also lacks a proper harbour. A dozen massive, battered barges are loaded in the shallows in the spring and summer, and are poled and then rowed out to meet ships and unload by means of rickety cranes that rise from the stems of the barges into their holds. Needless to say, this is a fair-weather operation only, and tricky even then if the wind is fresh and the seas high. Increasingly, Waterdhavian entrepreneurs have sent wagons north to buy the copper, nickel, and silver of Leilon at bargain prices and take it south to sell at Waterdeep’s harbour. Leilon’’s mines are guarded by “the Lances of Leilon,” a force of some two hundred fully armed, mounted lancers used to fighting off pirates, orcs, bugbears, and trolls. Each lancer carries an axe and knife, usually a sword of some sort, his lance, and a light crossbow which he is experienced in firing from horseback. Leilon’’s total population is some 3,000; its ruler is Pelindar Filmarva, Lord of Leilon. Leilon is a firm ally of Waterdeep, and considered a friend of the Lords’ Alliance. In the mountains east of Leilon’’s mines is at least one important abandoned dwarf-hold, “Southkrypt,” said to be home to many strange and dangerous creatures.

… Leilon consists of stout stone cottages with slate or thatch roofs, the latter being covered with a hardened
slurry of mud. The houses cluster together within a crescent-shaped earthen rampart on the landward side of the settlement. The rampart has a ditch on the outside and a wooden palisade on top.

… The hard-working miners of Leilon concentrate on digging rich lodes of copper, nickel, and silver from deep mines in the mountains east of the town, though a few older shafts even descend from within the town itself.

… Leilon is a growing community. Lord Filmarya has established a shrine to Tyr in town. It stands beside older shrines to Lathander and Tymora. The Cult of the Dragon and the Zhentarim are both reputed to be active in Leilon, and there are also dark tales of local cults who worship undead mages or spirits of the mine deeps.

An abandoned mage’’s tower, known as the High House of Thalivar, rises in the centre of town. It is guarded by its own ward. Details on the powers of the ward and the existence of tokens remain unknown. It is known, though, that it has guardian monsters, and they have so far proven deadly to all adventurers seeking to plunder the magic reputed to be therein….

Latest Documentation from an Elven Travel Book:

This sleepy mining town once served as a convenient resting place for travellers on the High Road. Now, the few travellers who still take this route shun Leilon, going miles out of their way to avoid even laying eyes on the town.

The High Tower of Thalivar long stood as a landmark here, abandoned by a forgotten mage. For generations, the tower proved a tempting target for plunderers – and, too often, a grave for them as well. The people of Leilon knew that the tower held guardian monsters, and they were content to leave it alone. However, the Spellplague’s twisted magic unleashed the creatures trapped in the tower, which quickly ravaged the helpless village. Now, the tower is a place of terror, its magic freezing in place all creatures whose eyes rest upon it, even for a moment.

From an old miner’s journal: The mines east of Leilon are rich in copper, nickel and silver. The mountains are honeycombed with mine shafts and tunnels, including several that open up into the town itself, and some that go very, very deep…

From an old adventurer’s journal: Based in the small coastal town of Leilon, on the High Road north of Waterdeep, this ragtag band of local toughs has done surprisingly well in a brief career of adventuring, plundering (and surviving) at least six of the Mage-Tombs in the mountains east of Leilon, slaughtering a colony of lizard-men in the nearby Mere of Dead Men (gaining some strange magical treasure thereby), and doing some caravan guarding for merchants in Neverwinter.

Volo’s Guide to the North

The first reference to Leilon in this book is in relation to the Place of the Unicorn:
One sight the Coast traveller should not miss is the Place of the Unicorn in the hills northeast of Leilon. The place can be found only at night. Wizards of the Coast believe that it lies in another dimension, reached only by a moongate (a magical gate that operates only in moonlight). The Place is sacred to Lurue, the unicorn of the Beast Cult. It is a stand of trees whose leaves are brilliant blue, surrounding a bluegrass meadow. Beings who rest therein are healed of all diseases, poisons, curses, and insanity. Unicorns (only) are also healed of physical damage. Beings who have no faith or are wavering in their beliefs often see Lurue herself in the trees, and their reaction may reshape their lives.

And one last thing from Volo’s Guide, there is mention of Manyclaws Alley, an alley notorious for being haunted by the ghosts of trolls. A footnote explains this a little bit more: The alley is actually haunted by nine heucuva. These are all that remains of a long-demolished temple to Loviatar. The monsters guard treasure that still lies buried beneath the alley in vaults long forgotten by the folk of Leilon.
Leilon is a small mining town that serves as a convenient resting place for weary travelers on the High Road between Neverwinter and Waterdeep. The Leilon military, known as the Lances of Leilon is composed of as many as 200 warriors. In times of need, citizens are incorporated into the militia.

Leilon is a member in good standing with the Lords’ Alliance due to the efforts of its leader Lord Pelindar Filmarya. Trade via sea is dangerous since the nearby shore is a shallow mudflat and the method used to transfer cargo from ships at sea to the land is very risky (consisting of a series of magically reinforced barges which are poled out to meet the boats whereupon cargo is transferred via rickety cranes that are impossible to use in high winds). Instead of relying on this form of trade, most of Leilon’s imports come via caravan out of Waterdeep. Despite the high quality of law and order in the town, there have long been rumours of both the Cult of the Dragon and the Zhentarim operating within its walls.

The Swords of Leilon Based in the small coastal town of Leilon, on the High Road north of Waterdeep, this ragtag band of local toughs has done surpris- ingly well in a brief career of adventur- ing, plundering (and surviving) at least six of the Mage-Tombs in the mountains east of Leilon, slaughtering a colony of lizard-men in the nearby Mere of Dead Men (gaining some strange magical treasure thereby), and doing some cara- van guarding for merchants in Neverwinter. Recently they lost some of their members in a bloody fight with mage-led hobgoblins in Ironford, and are spoiling for revenge. – TSR 1031 Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 1st Edition
Southerners usually learn the name of this town from maps, and pro- nounce it LEE-lon or LAY-lun. North- erners have always called it LIE-lon. This is one way to identity a south- erner in the northern wilderlands. This mining town of 3,000 folk is a firm ally of Waterdeep. Its ruler, Lord Pelindar Filmarya,3 keeps it within the Lords’ Alliance, and communicates regularly with Piergeiron of Waterdeep. Leilon consists of stout stone cottages with slate or thatch roofs, the latter being covered with a hardened slurry of mud. The houses cluster together within a crescent-shaped earthen rampart on the landward side of the settlement. The rampart has a ditch on the outside and a wooden palisade on top. The town is guarded by the Lances of Leilon. This is a force of 200 mounted lancers skilled at firing crossbows from horseback. They are clad in chain mail, with shields strapped to their chests and backs. The Lances wield axes, daggers, swords, light crossbows, and of course, lances. These fighters are always on patrol, seeking to minimize the raids by orcs, bugbears, trolls, and brigands. The hard-working miners of Leilon concentrate on digging rich lodes of copper, nickel, and silver from deep mines in the mountains east of the town, though a few older shafts even descend from within the town itself. The water near Leilon is shallow, with tidal mudflats extending a long way out from shore. Small bands of Leilonnar sometimes fish these with hurled nets. The mudflats make ship trade difficult. To overcome this, a dozen old, massive, battered barges have been magically protected against fire and rot. They’re poled out to meet ships, where rickety cranes attached to the high rear decks of the barges unload the cargoes. This can be done only in spring or summer, when the wind is low and the weather fair. This perilous practice is being supplanted by large, well-armed caravans coming into town from Waterdeep loaded with food and finewares. The caravans sell enough to make room to buy some of Leilon’s precious metal ores. Leilon is a growing community. Lord Filmarya has established a shrine to Tyr in town. It stands beside older shrines to Lathander and Tymora. The Cult of the Dragon and the Zhentarim are both reputed to be active in Leilon, and there are also dark tales of local cults who worship undead mages or spirits of the mine deeps. An abandoned mage’s tower, known as the High House of Thalivar, rises in the center of town. It is guarded by its own ward. Details on the powers of the ward and the exis- tence of tokens remain unknown. It is known, though, that it has guardian monsters, and they have so far proven deadly to all adventurers seeking to plunder the magic reputed to be therein.
This village is located northeast of Leilon, where the road that runs from the High Road to Triboar fades away into a mere trail. The road was largely abandoned long ago after orc attacks from the mountains east of Leilon. The orcs even paid human mages to work magic powerful enough to bury the road in some places and hurl down small keeps in others. Under the leadership of a chieftain called Uruth, the orcs expanded their holdings steadily, building a realm they called Uruth Ukrypt (roughly, Home of Uruth). Its name is echoed today in the Kryptgarden Forest. Too lazy or stupid to support themselves by farming, the orcs soon decimated the huntable game in their realm. They subsequently took to raiding human holdings for food. Some 400 years have passed since then, during which time concerted human attacks on the orcs ended their kingdom and almost drove them from the area entirely. Phandalin had been an important farming center before the orcs con- quered it. When they were driven out, the village was left largely in ruins, and it remains so today. No one lives there now but mon- sters, though passing hunters and rangers often camp in one of the more secure buildings. It has three deep wells that can still be used. The orc attacks also forced gnomes and dwarves to abandon a mountain delve near Phandalin where they were mining mithral together. This lost lode was called Wavecho Cave because the roll and boom of waves beating on the Sword Coast shore could be heard in the natural cavern. Some dwarves of the North dream of returning there, and the gnomes who dwell near Waterdeep consider it their rightful home. Both races con- stantly search the mountains and the subterranean passages for a way back into Wavecho Cave. Rich stores of mithral and magical items of gnomish and dwarven make were enchanted in Wavecho by human mages allied with the other races. These enchanted items are said to still lie in the caves and delvings. (Note that this is not the same place as the monster- infested dwarfhold called South- krypt.) The orcs attacked Wavecho in force, and in the spell battle between the defending mages and the wizards hired by the orcs, the land was changed, the ceilings of many caverns and chambers collapsed, and the very location of Wavecho was lost. The countryside near and in Phandalin is now best suited to adventur- ers and those who like to hunt mon- sters for sport. There have always been rumors of rich treasure lost in the fighting in the area that is just waiting for a lucky or persistent ven- turer to find it.
Places of Interest in Leilon The Knight’s Goblet The Goblet caters to travelers’ trade. It is clean, boring, and overpriced. The proprietor likes to roast whole boars in the taproom’s hearth and serves hearty, large, nutty-flavored loaves of bread with large slabs of the meat. The Orc’s Tusks The Tusks is favored by locals. It is crowded, cheaper than the Goblet, and friendly. Its taproom is domi- nated by an orc’s skull with large tusks upon which patrons are wont to hang amusing or embarrassing items. The Sword of Leilon This old, cozy establishment is a war- ren of small rooms inside. Guests often get lost and blunder into each others rooms. (Sometimes they get lost intentionally.) It is built on the site of an earlier inn where Leilon’s defenders used to gather because of the inn’s size. That inn burned down due to misadventure, but the name of this inn hearkens to those days of local glory. Manyclaws Alley This is the only dangerous spot in town. It’s reputed to be haunted by the ghosts of some trolls. The alley is actually haunted by nine heucuva Isee MC2). These are all that remains of a long-demolished tem- ple to Loviatar. The monsters guard treasure that still lies buried beneath the alley in vaults long forgotten by the folk of Leilon.
Thundertree This small, quiet logging hamlet of about 90 folk stands on the south bank of the Neverwinter River at the western edge of Neverwinter Wood. A good trail links it with the nearby city of Neverwinter, and all of the choice timber cut here goes down that trail to the shipyards, housebuilders, and carpenters of the city. Travelers will find only a pavilion to sleep in and not much of interest to buy except some small pelts from local trappers. A local ranger, Ansal Bloodshoul- der,2 serves as Thundertree’s infor- mal leader. He works with the town’s woodcutters to ensure that new trees are planted wherever timber is felled. He checks that trees are carefully chosen before they are cut, and that vines and diseased trees are cut out and burned. This careful method of logging has met with grudging approval from elves living nearby in Neverwinter Wood. -TSR 9393 Volo’s Guide to the North

Leilon: This sleepy mining town once served as a convenient resting place for travelers on the High Road. Now, the few travelers who still take this route shun Leilon, going miles out oftheir way to avoid even laying eyes on the town. The High Tower ofThalivar long stood as a land- mark here, abandoned by a forgotten mage. For generations, the tower proved a tempting target for plunderers-and, too often, a grave for them as well. The people ofLeilon knew that the tower held guard- ian monsters, and they were content to leave it alone. However, the Spellplague’s twisted magic unleashed the creatures trapped in the tower, which quickly rav- aged the helpless village. Now, the tower is a place of terror, its magic freeZing in place all creatures whose eyes rest upon it, even for a moment. – D&D 4th Edition – Neverwinter Campaign Setting
Leilon This small human mining community lies along the High Road on the Sword Coast. It lacks defensive walls and a proper harbor, but an earthen embankment with a wooden palisade shields it on the landward side, save for the gate- less town entrance that pierces the embankment. A dozen massive, battered barges are loaded into the shallows in the spring and summer, and are poled and then rowed out to meet ships and unload means of rickety cranes that rise from the stems of the barges into their holds. Needless to say, this is a fair-weather operation only, and tricky even then if the wind is fresh and the seas high. Increasingly, Waterdhavian entrepreneurs have sent wagons north to buy the copper, nickel, and silver of Leilon at bargain prices and take it south to sell at Waterdeep’s harbor for a generous profit. Leilon’s mines are guarded by the Lances of Leilon, a force of some two hundred fully-armed, mounted lancers used to fighting off pirates, orcs, bugbears, and trolls. Each lancer usually carries an axe and knife, a sword of some sort, his or her lance, and a light crossbow which he or she can fire easily from horseback. Leilon’s total population is around 3,000; its ruler is Pelindar Filmarya, Lord of Leilon. Leilon is a firm ally of Waterdeep and the Lords’ Alliance. In the mountains east of the mines is the abandoned dwar- ven hold of Southkrypt, an old silver mine in centuries past that is now home to many strange and dangerous monsters.
For example, your party is traveling on foot from Leilon to Neverwinter. A caravan takes six days to travel that dis- tance (a difference of 11 days and 17 days out of Waterdeep on the High Road). A PC band can walk this distance in 71⁄2 days, arriving at Neverwinter on the eighth day out of Leilon (6 × 1.25 = 7.5). – TSR 1109 City of Splendors
Unlike most northern towns, Leilon lacks defensive walls; an earthen rampart with a wooden palisade surrounded by a ditch shields it on the landward side, save for the gateless town entrance piercing the embankment. Leilon’s a growing community of 3,000 folk. An ally of Waterdeep, its ruler, Lord Pelindar Filmarya, keeps Leilon in the Lords’ Alliance and communicates regularly with Piergeiron of Waterdeep. Leilon consists of stout stone cottages with slate or thatch roofs, the latter being covered with a hardened slurry of mud. In the mountains east of the mines is the abandoned dwarven hold of Southkrypt, an old silver mine in centuries past that is now home to many strange and dangerous monsters. The water near Leilon is shallow, with tidal mud flats ex- tending a long way out from shore, making the town a lesser port city. Small bands of Leilonnar sometimes fish these with hurled nets. The mud flats make ship trade difficult. To over- come this, a dozen old, massive, battered barges have been magically protected against fire and rot. They’re poled out to meet ships, where rickety cranes attached to the high rear decks of the barges unload the cargoes. This can be done only in spring or summer, when the wind is low and the weather fair. Even in the best weather, the operation is tricky. This per- ilous practice is being supplanted by large, well-armed caravans coming into town from Waterdeep loaded with food and finewares. The caravans sell enough to make room to buy some of Leilon’s precious metal ores and take it south to sell at Waterdeep’s harbor for a generous profit. Pelindar has established a shrine to Tyr in town. It stands next to older shrines to Lathander and Tymora. The Cult of the Dragon and the Zhentarim are active in Leilon, and there are dark tales of local cults who worship undead mages or spir- its of the mine deeps. The town is guarded by the Lances of Leilon. This is a force of 200 mounted lancers skilled at firing crossbows from horse- back. They wear chain mail, with shields strapped to their chests and backs. Each lancer usually carries an axe, a knife, a sword, a lance, and a light crossbow that can be fired easily from horse- back. These fighters, always on patrol, seek to minimize raids by orcs, bugbears, trolls, brigands, and pirates (their specialty). Zhent agents are rumored to exist in Leilon, but their in- tent and motives uncertain. Their presence probably indicates an attempt to secure a trade route.
Phandalin Phandalin was an important farming center located northeast of Leilon, where the Triboar Cutoff East fades into a trail. The road was abandoned after years of orc attacks obliterated every caravan that passed down the road, conquering Phandalin in the process. When the orcs were driven out, the village was left largely in ruins, and it remains so today. Under the leadership of a chieftain called Uruth, the orcs ex- panded steadily, building a realm called Uruth Ukrypt (Home of Uruth). Its name echoes today in Kryptgarden Forest. Too lazy to support themselves by farming, the orcs devastated the game in their realm and subsequently took to raiding human holdings for food. Some 400 years have passed since then, during which time concerted human attacks decimated the orc kingdom and nearly drove the creatures from the area entirely. No one lives here now but monsters, though passing hunters and rangers often camp in one of the more secure buildings. It still has three usable deep wells, one of which is considered to be heavily tainted with an undetectable poison that kills the imbiber three days after ingestion. Orcs and half orcs are supposedly immune to the toxin. The orc attacks forced gnomes and dwarves to abandon a mountain delve near Phandalin where they mined mithral in a union they called the Phandelver’s Pact. This lost lode was called Wavecho Cave because the roll of waves beating on the shore could be heard in the natural cavern. Shortly before the mine was abandoned, a lode of platinum was discovered. The size is unknown, but a very old dwarf who worked the mine remembers that the vein “held great promise.” Phandalin is the best preserved of the many ruined keeps and villages scattered along the Sword Coast, most of which are little more than heaped stones, graves, and cellars hidden by reed grasses and creeping vines. Many of these areas shelter predatory beasts or passing adventurers. – TSR 1142 The North
Leilon (LEE-Iun) Population: 3,000 Government: Lord Pelindar Filmyra, Lord of Leilon. Leilon is a member of the Lords’ Alliance and a firm ally of Water- deep. This small human mining town on the Sword Coast sprawls along the High Road. Unlike most northern towns, it lacks walls. A wooden palisade atop an earthen bank shields the landward side, but the wall has no gate. The mines east of Leilon are rich in cop- per, nickel and silver. The mountains are honeycombed with mine shafts and tun- nels, including several that open up into the town itself, and some that go very, very deep. Leilon has no proper harbor. During good weather, a dozen massive ore barges are loaded in the shallows, then poled and rowed out to unload their cargo on waiting transport ships. Even in the best weather, the operation is tricky. – TSR 9233 FR5 The Savage Frontier

Leilon was a small mining town that serves as a convenient resting place for weary travelers on the High Road between Neverwinter and Waterdeep.

The mines east of Leilon are rich in copper, nickel and silver. The mountains are honeycombed with mine shafts and tunnels, including several that open up into the town itself, and some that go very, very deep. It is these tunnels that now provide the bulk of the adventure hooks for the ruins of Leilon. Some were constructed by the dwarves of the ancient shield dwarf realm of Haunghdannar.

Trade via sea was dangerous since the nearby shore is a shallow mudflat and the method used to transfer cargo from ships at sea to the land was very risky (consisting of a series of magically reinforced barges which are poled out to meet the boats whereupon cargo is transferred via rickety cranes that are impossible to use in high winds). Instead of relying on this form of trade, most of Leilon’s imports came via caravan out of Waterdeep. Despite the high quality of law and order in the town, there were rumours of both the Cult of the Dragon and the Zhents operating within its walls.

A secret Cult of the Dragon cell is based here in the catacombs beneath the former cemetery which include an ancient temple of Myrkul, the Adytum of the Skull. It is the lore from this temple that has revealed the existence of the legendary dracolich, Ebondeath, and its Mausoleum of Ebondeath beneath the Uthtower in the Mere of Dead Men.

Cultists patrol the ruins of Leilon but are careful not to reveal themselves. If they do reveal themselves they systematically slaughter any witnesses to their presence.

Zhents agents from [[Helm’s Hold]] sometimes explore the ruins due to rumours of ancient Zhent magic.

(A variation on HS1 The Slaying Stone could possibly be run here.)
Leilon.jpg

Leilon

Lost Mine of Phandelver PaeliusWorldBuilder PaeliusWorldBuilder